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Christianity 0ut of the Box

Never Underestimate the Underlings

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Loyalty comes in all shapes and sizes until questionable disruptions rise to the surface.

The definition of loyalty is: devoted attachment or affection for another, a feeling of allegiance.

The bond of sincerity or homage works both ways.  All parties involved uphold each other through integrity and honesty.  Such a relationship is of utmost importance and considered in some instances as almost sacred.

Often, one is considered a subject or subordinate to a person of notability or in a position of authority.

But….what happens when that trust is broken?

The person in authority may eliminate the subject quietly and subtlety from their life or remove them in a show of prestige.

The underling stands by observing the crumbling of their allegiance due to less than honest motivations. Drama unfolds before their very eyes leaving many questions unanswered.

As time passes information dribbles out like a leaky faucet. The underling remains devoted all the while analyzing data looming over the exposed jurisdiction.

Sometimes it is better to keep quiet.

Yet, for the inquisitive mind remaining subdued is not always easy.

Snooping around in the authority figures fans of admiration can place a mark on your forehead. Treason!  The underling is quickly viewed as the ultimate betrayer even if the drama is true.

The day arrives when the underling notices beady eyes and evil frowns staring as if your lunch splattered all over your face.

Co-workers stop texting.  Facebook friends un-friend you.  The few phone calls you received suddenly stop.

The next in line is the pink slip on your office desk from your most worthy ally; or so you thought.

How could you do this to me?” you scream at your boss.boss

“Sorry, but it wasn’t up to me” he says.

Then who? Who did this?”  Looking up at the ceiling and running his hands through his hair your boss avoids your hurt face.

NOOOOOOOOOOOOO!” the underling screams and begins to weep.

“How could he? I have been his most loyal and ardent associate standing up for his actions and protocol even when I didn’t agree.  How about all those thhinnngggss I, well you know, sort of hid? What about risking my reputation, job and personal integrity for his fraudulent activities?

 I have given up my personal life, weekends and much time missed with my family to support his plans and this is what I get?”

“You were asking too many questions. We tried to tell you to keep your mouth shut. In this business challenging his motives or agenda is the wrong thing to do.”

Colossians 3:23 “Whatever you do, work heartily, as for the Lord and not for men.”

Months later the clout of seniority is fractured, crippled by his lack of involvement or incompetence.  Interrogations into lawlessness and illegal violations set the stage for a major breach of conduct. Practice of inequality, favoritism and the abuse of privacy are at the center of controversy.  Whose job is on the line now?

Incrimination becomes the name of the game. “Pass the buck” interferes with “the buck stops here.”  Directives begin at the top.  Lowly subjects carry little influence.  They only do what they are told.  Forget honesty and integrity.  Everyone else is a scapegoat.

Throwing an underling under anyone’s bus is not a good idea.

my boss is a carpenter

http://www.foxnews.com/opinion/2013/05/21/president-obama-ceo-who-knows-nothing/?intcmp=trending#ixzz2TydM2ctu

http://www.humanevents.com/2013/05/20/fox-news-reporter-monitored-by-justice-department/

http://www.ijreview.com/2013/05/53781-president-obama-met-with-anti-tea-party-union-head-day-before-irs-conservative-group-targeting-began/

http://www.foxnews.com/opinion/2013/05/17/watergate-20-why-irs-scandal-is-far-worse/#ixzz2TsPXF5eS

 

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3 thoughts on “Never Underestimate the Underlings

  1. Underlings are usually expendable when leaders are facing a firing squad.

  2. it takes so little to build a relationship and years if ever to rebuild the trust

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